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TheZookie007

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1680 on: January 24, 2018, 04:52:02 AM »
When Paul Simon's Graceland tour made it to Harare, Zimbabwe, I was in the crowd there somewhere. It was magical, beyond words.


In 1967, he performed at the Monterey Pop Festival alongside Janis Joplin, Otis Redding, Ravi Shankar, The Who and Jimi Hendrix.


Look at that lineup! Amazing!
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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TheZookie007

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1681 on: January 24, 2018, 04:57:05 AM »
"It's less than an hour since the news broke that Ursula K. Le Guin has died and right now my Twitter feed, populated as it is with science fiction and fantasy writers, editors and fans, is a single, unbroken string of testimonials. N.K. Jemisin, who won back-to-back Hugo Awards for her novels "The Fifth Season" and "The Obelisk Gate," is recounting how a note from Le Guin filled her with joy. Novelist Madeline Ashby recounts meeting Le Guin at a lecture, mentioning to Le Guin that she was writing her thesis on her, and Le Guin insisting Ashby send it to her. She did. Le Guin wrote back with notes.

Neil Gaiman is saying, "I miss her as a glorious funny prickly person, & I miss her as the deepest and smartest of the writers, too." Patrick Nielsen Hayden, associate publisher of Tor Books, is saying, "She wasn't always right, but she was always wise."

On and on and on goes this immediate and real-time outpouring of grief and remembrance of a woman who gave us Earthsea, "The Left Hand of Darkness" and the short story "The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas," which is as much a parable for our time as anything that anyone has written, or likely will.

She was a supporting column of the genre, on equal footing and bearing equal weight to Verne or Wells or Heinlein or Bradbury. Losing her is like losing one of the great sequoias. As the unceasing flow of testimonials gives witness, nearly every lover and creator of science fiction and fantasy can give you a story of how Le Guin, through her words or presence, has illuminated their lives."

-- John Scalzi in the Los Angeles Times
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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rtpoe

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1682 on: January 25, 2018, 01:21:26 AM »
I already had it written, so....

URSULA K. LE GUIN (1929-2018):

She was born Ursula Kroeber in Berkeley, California, on Oct. 21, 1929, the youngest of four children and the only daughter of two anthropologists, Alfred L. Kroeber and Theodora Quinn Kroeber.

She fell in love with SF and fantasy at an early age, but grew disillusioned with how the stories “seemed to be all about hardware and soldiers: White men go forth and conquer the universe.”

After earning a master’s degree in romance literature of the Middle Ages and Renaissance from Columbia University in 1952, and won a Fulbright fellowship to study in Paris. There she met and married another Fulbright scholar, Charles Le Guin. Returning to the United States, she abandoned her graduate studies to raise a family; the Le Guins eventually settled in Portland, where Charles Le Guin taught history at Portland State University.

By the early 1960s Le Guin had written five unpublished novels. Eager to find a more welcoming market, she decided to try her hand at genre fiction.

Her first science-fiction novel, “Rocannon’s World,” came out in 1966. Two years later she published “A Wizard of Earthsea,” the first in a series about a world where the practice of magic is as precise as any science, and as morally ambiguous. More novels and accolades quickly followed. Her work was translated into over 40 languages and sold millions of copies across the globe, with some of her more popular titles still in print.
Le Guin was a staunch champion of the intellectual strength of science fiction and fantasy at a time when they were often relegated without a thought to the realm of the unserious “genre ghetto.” She spoke out against authors who used the tropes of science fiction and fantasy while refusing to acknowledge what they were writing, which led to a very public debate with Margaret Atwood over the boundaries of SF&F and a very public shaming of Kazuo Ishiguro.

At the 2014 National Book Awards, Le Guin was given the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. She accepted the medal on behalf of her fellow writers of fantasy and science fiction, who, she said, had been “excluded from literature for so long” while literary honors went to the “so-called realists.”

“Hard times are coming,” she said, “when we’ll be wanting the voices of writers who can see alternatives to how we live now, can see through our fear-stricken society and its obsessive technologies to other ways of being, and even imagine real grounds for hope. We’ll need writers who can remember freedom — poets, visionaries — realists of a larger reality.”

Neil Gaiman does the honors at the 2014 National Book Awards:
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« Last Edit: January 25, 2018, 01:34:58 AM by rtpoe »
rtpoe

"And for the season it was winter, and they that know the winters of that country know them to be sharp and violent, and subject to cruel and fierce storms . . . For summer being done, all things stand upon them with a weather-beaten face, and the whole country, full of woods and thickets, represented a wild and savage hue."

William Bradford, Plymouth Plantation, 1640

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gonZo

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1683 on: January 26, 2018, 01:03:25 AM »
When Paul Simon's Graceland tour made it to Harare, Zimbabwe, I was in the crowd there somewhere. It was magical, beyond words.

I saw the same tour (some different players because of visa issues in the 2 countries) at the Smith Center in Chapel Hill, NC. It was easily the most moving live performance I've ever seen.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2018, 01:06:14 AM by gonZo »

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salem

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1684 on: January 26, 2018, 02:20:46 AM »
A bit late off the mark, but I just dicovered that Peter Wyngarde of TV series Department S and Jason King died on the 15th of january, aged 90. He was also in the Doctor Who story 'Planet of Fire' way back in 1984.

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3deroticer

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1685 on: January 26, 2018, 11:13:46 PM »
http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2018/01/20/porn-star-is-found-dead-in-rehab-fifth-adult-film-actress-to-die-in-three-months.html

From FOXnews so I am not sure what to make of it! But I wonder if FOXnews are getting deep interest in Porn Star lifestyle for a reason?
With the recent accusation and payoff of Trump lifestyle secrets. Here is the strange pattern that I saw that seems quite of lot of people that had ties to the Russian Investigation are showing up dead, and now a handful of porn stars are ending up dead in 3 month and very close to the new sudden interest in porn stars. This is the stuff that would make a movie plotline.
Remember, life is too short to actually get annoyed about what someone you don’t know, don’t care about, and don’t like thinks about you and what you enjoy doing.

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TheZookie007

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1686 on: January 28, 2018, 01:01:16 AM »
A bit late off the mark, but I just dicovered that Peter Wyngarde of TV series Department S and Jason King died on the 15th of january, aged 90. He was also in the Doctor Who story 'Planet of Fire' way back in 1984.

Those were some cool shows, and Mr. Wyngarde was super-cool in them. :(
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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TheZookie007

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1687 on: January 28, 2018, 01:04:25 AM »
Washington Post: "Mort Walker, whose ‘Beetle Bailey’ was a comic-page staple for decades, dies at 94"

Mort Walker, whose "Beetle Bailey" comic strip followed the exploits of a lazy G.I. and his inept cohorts at the dysfunctional Camp Swampy, and whose dedication to his art form led him to found the first museum devoted to the history of cartooning, died Jan. 27 at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 94.

Tom Richmond, a former president of the National Cartoonists Society, confirmed the death. The cause was pneumonia.

In contrast with the work-shirking soldier he immortalized, Mr. Walker was a man of considerable drive and ambition. He drew his daily comic strip for TK years, longer than any other American artist in the history of the medium.

Debuting in 1950, "Beetle Bailey" was distributed by King Features Syndicate and eventually reached 200 million readers in 1,800 newspapers in more than 50 countries. Beetle and company appeared in comic books, television cartoons, games and toys and were also featured in a musical with the book by Mr. Walker and, in 2010, on a U.S. Postal Service postage stamp.

"Beetle Bailey" was among the first cartoons to mark a shift in the funny pages from the serial strips of the previous decade to the graphically simpler gag-a-day model that predominates today.

Beetle's cast includes the title character, a lanky goof-off whose eyes are always covered by the visor of his hat or helmet; his rotund nemesis, Sgt. Snorkel, a violent but sentimental man who frequently beat Beetle to a pulp of squiggly lines; the ineffectual Gen. Halftrack, who ran Camp Swampy (a place the Pentagon had lost track of); Halftrack's voluptuous secretary, Miss Buxley; Cookie, the hairy-shouldered chef and purveyor of inedible meatballs; and the bumpkin Pvt. Zero.

The characters never saw battle, and weapons and uniforms were not updated. Mr. Walker said that the military setting was simply a convenient stand-in for the pecking order of which everyone is a part…

Starting in 1954, Mr. Walker wrote another hit cartoon, the widely syndicated family strip "Hi and Lois," originally illustrated by Dik Browne (later the creator of "Hägar the Horrible"). Mr. Walker said he wanted to depict a loving family "together against the world ... instead of against each other."

He thrived on collaboration, working with assistants (including Jerry Dumas and Bill Janocha, and his sons Brian and Greg) to review jokes every week and to create at least eight other strips, among them "Boner's Ark" and "Sam's Strip."

Brian and Greg, who have written "Hi and Lois" since the 1980s and have assisted Mr. Walker with Beetle gags and inking since the 1970s, will continue to produce "Beetle Bailey."

Even as he was devising his gags — he claimed to have 80,000 unused jokes in storage — Mr. Walker devoted himself to establishing a museum that would treat the comic strip as a serious art form.

In 1974, with a check from the Hearst Foundation and refurbishing help from family and friends, he opened the Museum of Cartoon Art in a mansion in Greenwich, Conn. The collection grew with donations of art from newspaper syndicates and the estates of cartoonists, and is today worth an estimated $20 million.

…Mr. Walker, who became president of the National Cartoonists Society, won its Golden T-Square award for 50 years of service to the industry in 1999…In 1990, the Pentagon recognized Mr. Walker (if not Camp Swampy) with the Certificate of Appreciation for Patriotic Civilian Service. "As hard as it is to find anything at the Pentagon," the veteran gagman quipped, "they finally found a sense of humor."


"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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TheZookie007

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1688 on: February 06, 2018, 04:55:12 AM »
Deadline: "John Mahoney Dies: Emmy-Nominated Frasier Star Was 77"

John Mahoney, who played Kelsey Grammer and David Hyde Pierce’s father on the hit NBC sitcom Frasier, died on Sunday, Deadline has confirmed. He was 77.

Born in England, Mahoney first discovered acting at the Stretford Chi!dren’s Theater. His interest in acting brought him to the United States and studied at Quincy University before joining the Army. He took acting classes at St. Nicholas Theatre which was the start of his professional acting career as he was encouraged by John Malkovich to join Steppenwolf Theater. While there, he won Clarence Derwent Award as Most Promising Male Newcomer. He would eventually go on to win a Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Play for his performance in John Guare’s The House of Blue Leaves.

In 1987 he made his feature film debut in Barry Levinson’s Tin Men. He continued to add film credits to his resume with impressive roles in iconic films such as Say Anything…, Reality Bites, In the Line of Fire, The American President, Eight Men Out as well as the Coen BrothersBarton Fink and The Hudsucker Proxy. He also appeared as Steve Carell’s father in Dan in Real Life.

But it was his role in Frasier as the titular character’s fussy, unfiltered father Martin Crane that earned him the most recognition. He appeared on the show from the start in 1993 until 2004. The role earned him two Emmy nominations, two Golden Globe nominations and a Screen Actors Guild Award win. In addition to Frasier, Mahoney also appeared on Cheers, Becker, ER, Burn Notice, In Treatment, and Hot in Cleveland.

Mahoney was also known for his voice work which started with W. B. Yeats’ “The Words upon the Window-Pane” for the award-winning National Radio Theater of Chicago. He voiced characters in many classic animated features including The Iron Giant, Antz, Atlantis: The Lost Empire as well as the follow-up Atlantis: Milo’s return. In 2007, he reunited with his Frasier co-stars on The Simpsons and voiced the character of Dr. Robert Terwiiliger, Sr., the father of Grammer’s Sideshow Bob and Pierce’s Cecil.

On stage, he co-starred as the Old Man in the Broadway revival of Prelude to a Kiss and in March 2008, opened in the world premiere of Better Late at the Northlight Theatre in Illinois. In 2013, he was a featured ensemble cast member in The Birthday Party which played at Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre.

"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )