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Spinster

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1665 on: December 07, 2017, 07:35:24 PM »
RIP August Ames, one of my favorite adult stars. Naturally beautiful and breasts chiseled like a Greek statue. Apparently she committed suicide allegedly because she was bullied by LGBT twitter users after she voiced concerns of not wanting to perform with gay or bisexual male peformers.  :'(

P.S. She suffered from bipolar disorder, depression and had been a victim of molestation earlier in life.


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rtpoe

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1666 on: December 29, 2017, 02:02:30 AM »
A few others from 2017, who should not be forgotten:

CHRISTINE KEELER (1942 - 2017):

Born in Hayes, England, to a poor, abusive family, she left home at the age of 17 in the hopes of finding a better life. While working as a waitress, a customer suggested she get a job as a dancer at Murray’s Cabaret Club in Soho. There, Keeler met Stephen Ward, a social-climbing doctor who moved in aristocratic circles. Keeler later described Ward as trafficking in espionage and sex; the press called him Keeler's "pimp".

At a party hosted by Ward in 1961, Keeler found that she'd neglected to bring a swimsuit, and the one offered was too tight. She decided to swim in the nude. It was when coming out of the pool, wearing nothing but a small towel, that she was formally introduced to Secretary of War John Profumo.

Their affair was as brief as her towel. But that didn't cover the scandal that broke when it was revealed that Keeler was also boffing the Russian naval attaché, Eugene Ivanov.

The scandal grew, with tales of wild parties and politicians. The Denning Report, detailing all the dirt, was released in 1963 and led to the downfall of PM Harold Macmillan's government.

Unfortunately, Keeler could never escape the scandal. She was in a No-Win situation. It was good that she rose above her abusive upbringing, but bad that she used her sex appeal to do so. She was useful to men when she fulfilled their sexual desires, but discarded when those affairs became public. “It’s been a misery for me, living with Christine Keeler,” she said in a 2001 biography, The Truth at Last.

Over fifty years later, we still can't deal with the intersection of sexuality and politics.

HELMUT KOHL (1930 - 2017):

A business executive with a doctorate in history, he entered politics in 1955. He was elected as the youngest member of the Parliament of Rhineland-Palatinate in 1959 as a member of the Christian Democratic Union party and became Minister-President of his home state in 1969. Moving up in the ranks, Kohl was elected Chancellor of Germany in 1982 after the liberal Free Democratic Party had switched sides to support the CDU.

Strongly committed to European integration, he worked with French President François Mitterrand to push through the Maastricht Treaty, which established the European Union and the euro currency. The contacts he developed in East Germany helped make the process of German Reuinification (which he oversaw) smooth and relatively painless.

Chancellor Angela Merkel started her political career as Kohl's protegée and was known in the 1990s as "Kohl's girl;" in January 1991 he lifted the then little-known Merkel to national prominence by appointing her to the federal cabinet.

He was defeated for re-election in 1998, after his economic policies had led to a ten-year recession. Political scandals that came to light after he left office tainted his legacy.

But it cannot be denied that it was his leadership that made Germany what it is today.

"This man who was great in every sense of the word—his achievement, his role as a statesman in Germany at its historical moment—it's going to take a while until we can truly assess what we have lost in his passing." - Angela Merkel

"I will never forget walking with him through the Brandenburg Gate in 1994 for a large rally on the eastern side, and seeing genuine hope in the eyes of tens of thousands of young people. I knew at that moment that Helmut Kohl was the man who could help them realize their dreams. History continues to prove that he delivered." - Bill Clinton

JOHN B. ANDERSON (1922-2017):

Born in Rockford IL, he won election to the House of Representatives as a Republican in 1960. Initially one of the most conservative members, his views moderated through his tenure in the 60s. He spoke passionately for the Open Housing Law to fight racial discrimination, criticized the Vietnam War, and supported the Equal Rights Amendment.

He continued to serve in the House with distinction. In 1978, he decided to toss his hat into the ring for the GOP presidential nomination in 1980. At a Republican primary debate on January 5 of that year, he broke with the party line. Saying that lowering taxes, increasing defense spending, and balancing the budget were an impossible combination, he instead proposed a 50 cent a gallon gas tax, in part to conserve energy. “We’ve got to pull up our socks in this country. We’ve got to be willing to sacrifice something today in order to secure a better future, and a better tomorrow.”

The pundits went crazy over his honesty. “Put me down as a believer,” wrote the normally skeptical columnist Richard Reeves. “John Anderson is the most impressive candidate in the presidential field. … Reporters are not used to politicians who look you directly in the eye and tell you exactly what they believe.” While the GOP establishment helped grease Reagan's path to the nomination, others said Anderson would make a credible independent candidate.

When he did announce his independent candidacy in April, he was polling as high as 25% in a three-way matchup with Reagan and Carter.

It didn't last. Fights to get on the ballot in every state drained his campaign coffers. At the first general election debate, Carter refused to attend, and Reagan proved to be a seriously credible candidate. By the time the next debate rolled around, Anderson's polling was below the threshold for inclusion. On Election Day, Anderson won slightly less than 7 percent of the vote.

In his later years, Anderson made a career of speaking on voting and election issues.

"But Anderson’s run did have a lasting effect: It was the start of a phenomenon that reappeared in many subsequent campaigns. From Gary Hart to Bruce Babbitt to Paul Tsongas to Richard Lugar, candidates have trod a path where “hard truths” were offered to voters, where independence from political orthodoxy was a key. All of them won attention and plaudits; none of them won a nomination." - Jeff Greenfield


Keeler, during the height of the Profumo Affair; Kohl, looking intensely serious as always; Anderson on the campaign trail.
rtpoe

"He stood beside a cottage lone
And listened to a lute,
One summer's eve, when the breeze was gone,
And the nightingale was mute."

Thomas K. Hervey, The Devil's Progress

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Goldeneye

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1667 on: December 29, 2017, 06:05:19 AM »
God damn that's sad. Also, Rose Marie of The Dick Van Dyke Show died today at 94. A well regarded documentary about her career was released last year.

RIP August Ames, one of my favorite adult stars. Naturally beautiful and breasts chiseled like a Greek statue. Apparently she committed suicide allegedly because she was bullied by LGBT twitter users after she voiced concerns of not wanting to perform with gay or bisexual male peformers.  :'(

P.S. She suffered from bipolar disorder, depression and had been a victim of molestation earlier in life.



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TheZookie007

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1668 on: December 31, 2017, 05:24:07 AM »
NBC News: "Erica Garner, activist daughter of Eric Garner, dies at 27 after c0ma"

Erica Garner, who became an activist for police reform after her father's words of "I can't breathe" were used as a rallying cry for a movement, died Saturday after being in a c0ma for several days, according to a statement posted to her official Twitter account. She was 27.

Garner, the oldest daughter of Eric Garner, suffered from cardiac arrest a week prior and was being hospitalized in Brooklyn, New York, her family said.

"Erica the world loves you. I love you. I am glad you came into our lives," family members said in a tweet. "May you find the peace in the next life that you deserved while you were here."

Her mother, Esaw Snipes-Garner, earlier told the New York Daily News that the medical emergency was triggered by an asthma attack. Garner had suffered an earlier heart attack after giving birth to her son in August, Snipes-Garner said. Her heart was later found to be enlarged.

The Rev. Al Sharpton told NBC New York that Garner died of natural causes Saturday morning at Woodhull Hospital while surrounded by her family.

"They stayed with her to the end — she was a warrior to the end," Sharpton, the president of the National Action Network and an MSNBC contributor, told reporters.

Garner gained national prominence after speaking out in the wake of her father's death in 2014 — an incident caught on cellphone video and one of several high-profile police encounters involving unarmed black men.

The NYPD tried to arrest Eric Garner, 43, for allegedly peddling loose cigarettes. When he refused to be handcuffed, video showed him being taken down by an officer who put him in a chokehold. He was recorded repeating the phrase "I can't breathe" 11 times, and later died at the hospital.

A medical examiner ruled his death a homicide. A grand jury declined to indict the officer involved, although the city of New York reached a $5.9 million settlement with the Garner family in 2015 for a wrongful-death lawsuit.

"Sometimes [people think] he had a heart attack ... It's a shame because I know what happened on that video," Garner told NBCBLK in March 2015.

Eric Garner's death drew condemnation from the Black Lives Matter movement and led New York Mayor Bill de Blasio to reexamine the department's use-of-force policy and neighborhood policing program.

Garner became on outspoken critic of de Blasio, as well as the Democratic establishment. Shortly after confirming her death, Garner's official Twitter account lashed out at the mayor, demanding that he "explain how she died with no justice." It also asked that "out of respect to Erica please do not request comment if the journalist is not Black."

De Blasio later offered his condolences to Garner's family, and called her death "a horrible tragedy."

"This city will miss her unshakable sense of justice and passion for humanity,"
he tweeted.

Erica Garner was also a public supporter of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in the 2016 presidential election. Sanders on Saturday posted a series of tweets memorializing Garner and her fight for equality.

"I had the honor of getting to know Erica and I was inspired by the commitment she made working towards a more just world for her children and future generations," Sanders tweeted. "She was a fighter for justice and will not be forgotten."

Garner often marched in anti-police brutality and Black Lives Matter demonstrations, and set up a foundation in honor of her father. She also told NBCBLK that her goal was to continue fighting for justice for him and others caught in similar situations.

"People ask, 'When will you stop marching? What do you want from marching?' He was my father," Garner said. "I will always march."
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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Spinster

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1669 on: January 03, 2018, 09:42:44 PM »
Also within the Porn world, a girl who I liked a lot back in the day, is Yurizan Beltran of a drug overdose. Died a few days after August Ames. RIP  :'(

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Juggernaut76

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1670 on: January 03, 2018, 09:46:09 PM »
stay away from drugs people unless they make your boobs bigger it's hard to say stay away from those so be safe with them.
Always move forward the end goal that is the Juggernaut way

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TheZookie007

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1671 on: January 04, 2018, 01:01:35 AM »
stay away from drugs people unless they make your boobs bigger it's hard to say stay away from those so be safe with them.

Well said.

AVN, Dec. 13, 2017: "Yurizan Beltran Passes Away"
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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solvegas

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1672 on: January 07, 2018, 07:06:16 PM »
Just found out comedian Jerry Van Dyke has died at the age of 86 on Friday the sixth. I remember seeing him first in a show called " My mother the car " when I was k1d. He also was a supporting actor in a John Wayne movie called " McClintock ". Most know him as an assistant coach on the TV series " Coach " as Luther Van Dam.  :'(

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TheZookie007

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1673 on: January 07, 2018, 11:32:57 PM »
Just found out comedian Jerry Van Dyke has died at the age of 86 on Friday the sixth.

He was the younger brother of comedian/actor Dick Van Dyke, and had his debut TV appearance on The Dick Van Dyke Show, playing Rob Petrie's younger brother, Stacey.
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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rtpoe

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1674 on: January 09, 2018, 01:28:47 AM »
JOHN YOUNG (1930-2018):

After graduating from Georgia Tech in 1952 with a degree in aeronautical engineering, he joined the Navy where he logged over 15,000 hours in various aircraft. Presumably looking for more challenges, he joined NASA in 1962 as part of "Astronaut Group 2".

He was picked to pilot the Gemini 3 craft in 1965, the first manned mission for that two-seater craft. The corned beef sandwich he snuck aboard got him a reprimand, but didn't stop his career. The next year he commanded Gemini 10.

When the Apollo program came around, Young was chosen to be a part of those missions. He flew the command module in the landing's full dress rehearsal of Apollo 10. As commander of Apollo 16, he left his bootprints in the Descartes Highlands.

When the Shuttle program came around, Young was naturally a part of it. He commanded the first orbital flight, STS-1, in 1981, and STS-9 in 1983. As Chief Astronaut of the Shuttle program, he argued incessantly for safety upgrades in the wake of the Challenger disaster. His criticisms touched too many nerves, and he got sidelined to the role of "special assistant" to the director of the Johnson Space Center for engineering, operations and safety.

In a chapter of his autobiography titled "Mountain of Memos," Young said his criticisms "had been found to be too newsworthy for NASA to continue to tolerate." Addressing the astronaut office, Young apologized for "no longer being able to defend them."

The response was a standing ovation.

"My life has been long, and it has been interesting. It's also been a lot of fun, and a lot of hard, challenging work. If I could do it over, I would do it over the very same way. Most of it has been a marvel to me."

In training for Gemini 3:
rtpoe

"He stood beside a cottage lone
And listened to a lute,
One summer's eve, when the breeze was gone,
And the nightingale was mute."

Thomas K. Hervey, The Devil's Progress

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TheZookie007

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1675 on: January 10, 2018, 08:49:35 AM »
Talk about having The Right Stuff.

Godspeed, Captain Young. Godspeed.
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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CarlTL

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1676 on: January 13, 2018, 04:57:05 PM »
College Football broadcaster, Keith Jackson dead at 89.

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solvegas

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1677 on: January 13, 2018, 05:22:46 PM »
College Football broadcaster, Keith Jackson dead at 89.

Oh no ! Guess we will never hear FUUMMMMBLE ! ever again.  :'(

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rtpoe

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1678 on: January 14, 2018, 04:47:08 AM »
Keith Jackson (1928-2018):

Hear the eternally pleasing voice of Jackson, who died at 89 vivid years Friday night, and you might close your eyes and see the leaves turning outdoors even while remaining upon the sofa. Hear the voice of Jackson, and you might know the football situation on the television called for gravitas, even if the unpretentious voice did manage to arrive at gravitas without trying. Hear that voice, and every American region seemed contained somewhere within it, from the boyhood on a Georgia farm near the Alabama line, to the longtime residence in Los Angeles, to all the chronic alighting everywhere in between. - Chuck Culpepper, Washington Post

They must have known that the 2006 Rose Bowl was Jackson's last game, since it was one of the greatest college football games ever.

http://youtube.com/embed/Yh_DgeN150A
rtpoe

"He stood beside a cottage lone
And listened to a lute,
One summer's eve, when the breeze was gone,
And the nightingale was mute."

Thomas K. Hervey, The Devil's Progress

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rtpoe

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Re: The R.I.P. Thread
« Reply #1679 on: January 24, 2018, 04:13:02 AM »
HUGH MASEKELA (1939-2018)

Born in Witbank, South Africa, he was inspired to take up the trumpet by the film "Young Man with a Horn" as a teenager. After the Sharpeville Massacre in 1960, he was pressured to leave South Africa because of his activism and eventually settled in New York where he hooked up with Harry Belafonte's jazz band. The musicians he met - including Louis Armstrong and Dizzy Gillespie - encouraged him to develop his own style. “[They] said, ‘Listen, if you’re going to play jazz, you’re just going to be a statistic like all of us. Why don’t you infuse some of the stuff from your home into your music, and then maybe you’ll come up with something that will interest everybody and that we can learn from,'” Masekela told NPR in 2004. “And I guess I came up with some kind of a hybrid.”

In 1967, he performed at the Monterey Pop Festival alongside Janis Joplin, Otis Redding, Ravi Shankar, The Who and Jimi Hendrix. He made it big in 1968 when his single "Grazin' in the Grass" became a worldwide hit. He'd collaborate and perform with many musicians around the world, including, most famously, Paul Simon.

With his career secure, he became an activist. Masekela wrote "Soweto Blues" after the 1976 riots, and the song became an anthem of the anti-apartheid movement. He also called for Nelson Mandela's release in the 1987 hit "Bring Him Back Home". He himself made it back home in 1990, after Mandela became president.

In June 2010, he performed at both the opening concert of the Fifa World Cup and the tournament's opening ceremony in Soweto's Soccer City.

"When I observe bra Hugh's trumpet, it is not merely a musical instrument that I see, but a torch that illuminated the light of hope during our darkest hour, especially when he boldly sang "bring back Nelson Mandela, bring him back home to Soweto." " - South Africa Culture Minister Nathi Mthethwa

Bra Hugh, holding the torch:
rtpoe

"He stood beside a cottage lone
And listened to a lute,
One summer's eve, when the breeze was gone,
And the nightingale was mute."

Thomas K. Hervey, The Devil's Progress