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detroitmaggs

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New to morphing, enlarge without Liquify?
« on: January 20, 2012, 12:14:00 AM »
Hi, I've recently purchased photoshop and have begun morphing pictures. Unfortunately, all i know how to do is create a new layer with the body part i wish to morph and use the liquify tool. The picture ends up looking kind of poor, so i was wondering if anyone could tell me if there's a way to make the breasts/butt significantly larger without over using the Liquify tool? I don't want to take parts from another picture, just keep the original. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Who knows, if i think they're good enough, I might even post some on here! ;D

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gonZo

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Re: New to morphing, enlarge without Liquify?
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2012, 02:15:08 PM »

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detroitmaggs

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Re: New to morphing, enlarge without Liquify?
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2012, 08:50:50 PM »
Actually I just learned how to form ouroboros' topic, but thanks.  :)

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gonZo

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Re: New to morphing, enlarge without Liquify?
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2012, 10:20:20 PM »
They're both good. There's also a pile of tutorials here: http://www.bearchive.com/~Tutorials/tutorials/photomanip/index.html

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Bad Kitty

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Re: New to morphing, enlarge without Liquify?
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2012, 02:24:38 PM »
liquify is a great tool, but it's best for fine tuning a layer, rather than for doing the actual enlarging.

i'd recommend enlarging with Edit: Free Transform to get the size correct, then use liquify for shape, then the eraser tool with a hard edge to trim the edges to a nice sharp smooth line.

then you usually need to do some shadow work, to make the lighting of the boobs more believable. subtle is best, but it needs to be in keeping with other shadow intensities in the picture. the burn tool is great for shadows.

use lots of layers if you need to, and to experiment with different approaches. :)
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poentagram

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Re: New to morphing, enlarge without Liquify?
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2012, 08:28:36 PM »
you can use layers and liquify with the brush tool to get rid of the distortions that liquify causes.

in the "layers" window, you can select the layer you are working with and isolate the layer so that the brush you are working with will not paint anywhere beyond the edges of the object within the layer. for instance, if you are working with a layer that is a boob and you make all other layers invisible so that it just looks like a boob on a white and grey checkerboard, your brush will not produce marks anywhere except within the boob shape itself. to do this, where it says "Lock:" on the layers window, click the first button next to it (the button looks like a little checkerboard and is called "lock transparent pixels.") By doing this, you will have an easier time shading or highlighting the edges with a brush or burn/dodge tool.

It is also helpful to download new brushes for painting textures like skin. If you search the web for "skin texture photoshop brushes," or "hair photoshop brushes," et cetera, you will find many, especially through deviantart. these download as .abr files, which you place in the photoshop brushes folder. they may then be found and selected for use in the dropdown menu of your brushes prompt. if you use these with the right amount of subtlety, the textural effects can be quite good.

to get the right colors to use, use the color dropper tool from the body or garment you are trying to replicate. but bear in mind it takes practice and time and subtletly to get skin painting right. in old master or academic paintings, forms were painted through numerous thin transparent glazes atop one another. in photoshop, it tends to be the same. one cannot simply paint skin by choosing a skin-like color anymore than a painter could paint skin just by buying a tube of skin-colored paint and putting down a coat of it. start with a solid base color, add the darker tones where shade is necessary with the brush set at 0% hardness, and then gradually make the brush a lower and lower % of opacity to build up the appearance of flesh