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TheZookie007

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #15 on: June 29, 2017, 03:40:01 AM »
Forty Years Ago Today:

Me  ;D

Happy birthday! :)
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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TheZookie007

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #16 on: June 29, 2017, 03:47:32 AM »
Missed this anniversary by about a month but:

1967: On May 26 (in the UK) and on June 2 (in the US):
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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rtpoe

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2017, 12:11:56 AM »
Forty Years Ago Today:

Me  ;D

Happy B-Day, you breast-lover, you!
rtpoe

Every year, in November, at the season that follows on the hour of the dead, the crowning and majestic hour of autumn, reverently I go to visit the chrysanthemums in the places where chance offers them to my sight.

Maurice Maeterlinck, "Chrysanthemums", The Double Garden, 1911.

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CarlTL

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #18 on: June 30, 2017, 01:28:09 AM »
Forty Years Ago Today:

Me  ;D

Happy B-Day, you breast-lover, you!

Given that that I've been visiting this place since by Freshman year in College I've been here for over half my life...sad really...

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rtpoe

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #19 on: July 05, 2017, 02:02:55 AM »
TWO HUNDRED YEARS AGO: July 4, 1817

Construction begins on the Erie Canal in Rome, NY.

The nation's first great infrastructure project, it was done at a time when there were no civil engineers in the country. It was planned, designed, and built all by amateurs. Done by hand and horse, too. No heavy equipment at all.

Eight years later, it was finished. New York City had a direct water route to the Great Lakes, and would use that to become the biggest port on the east coast.
rtpoe

Every year, in November, at the season that follows on the hour of the dead, the crowning and majestic hour of autumn, reverently I go to visit the chrysanthemums in the places where chance offers them to my sight.

Maurice Maeterlinck, "Chrysanthemums", The Double Garden, 1911.

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TheZookie007

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #20 on: July 05, 2017, 05:23:57 AM »
1852:

Born into slavery around 1818, Frederick Douglass would eventually escape, head north and become a key leader of the abolition movement. 165 years ago today, on July 5th, 1852, in Rochester, New York, he was asked to address the Rochester Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society. The result was one of his most famous speeches: "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro."

Quote

...I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you this day rejoice are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence bequeathed by your fathers is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak today?

What, to the American slave, is your Fourth of July? I answer: a day that reveals to him, more than all other days of the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is a constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciation of tyrants, brass fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade and solemnity, are, to Him, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy—a thin veil to cover up crimes that would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation of the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of these United States at this very hour...

It is not recorded whether or not Mr. Douglass was invited to speak before the Rochester Ladies ever again.
"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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rtpoe

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #21 on: August 26, 2017, 02:51:38 AM »
August 20, 1977: Voyager 2 is launched.

August 25, 1981: Voyager 2 has its closest approach to Saturn

August 25, 1989: Voyager 2 has its closest approach to Neptune

Together, Voyagers 1 and 2 returned photos of swirling storms on Jupiter, rows of ringlets around Saturn, the bluish haze of Uranus, and the Great Dark Spot on Neptune. The spacecraft photographed the planets’ moons, too, revealing icy cracks on Europa, a volcanic plume on Io, and intricate terrain on Triton.

"No matter how you measure it, whether you measure the amount of mass or you measure the number of bodies, most of our solar system exists out beyond the orbits of the asteroids," said imaging team member Carolyn Porco. "So we could not have claimed to know our own solar system until Voyager had toured the giant planets."

"It’ll never happen like this again because we’ve been to all the planets and we’ve been to comets," Porco said. "We’ve been all over the solar system now. We’ll never again have the kind of encounters that we had with Voyager, because we know too much now."

That’s the thing about uncovering new worlds—you can only do it once. While Cassini provides dazzling views of Saturn, far better than anything the Voyager mission could have sent back, the photographs don’t shock as they did 40 years ago. The thrill of discovery isn’t quite the same.

"Voyager Made the Solar System a Real Place" - Marina Koren, Vox
rtpoe

Every year, in November, at the season that follows on the hour of the dead, the crowning and majestic hour of autumn, reverently I go to visit the chrysanthemums in the places where chance offers them to my sight.

Maurice Maeterlinck, "Chrysanthemums", The Double Garden, 1911.

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Cutter

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #22 on: August 26, 2017, 10:15:23 AM »
And both are STILL sending back information.  40 years and still ticking.
Cutter

If you find yourself in a fair fight, your tactics SUCK!


My DVD   http://mightyo.site.aplus.net/ussclamagoretourdvd.com/

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solvegas

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #23 on: August 26, 2017, 12:34:22 PM »
And both are STILL sending back information.  40 years and still ticking.

Thanks to their compact plutonium reactors. They were designed for maybe five years yet 40 years later they are still ticking.

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TheZookie007

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2017, 05:10:54 AM »
1967: 50 years ago today, the finale of The Fugitive was aired.

Quote
August 29, 1967, was “the day the running stopped” for Richard Kimble, who had spent four seasons searching for justice on ABC’s gripping drama The Fugitive. The previous week, audiences had eagerly tuned in to Part I of “The Judgment,” the series finale that promised to resolve the existential plight that made Kimble—falsely accused of murdering his wife and sentenced to death—into a mythic hero around the world. (Decades later, it would also inspire the Oscar-winning 1993 Fugitive feature film, starring Harrison Ford.)

In Part I, the elusive One-Armed Man, whom Kimble had seen fleeing the scene of the crime, was arrested after a strip-club brawl—then mysteriously bailed out of jail by a corrupt bail bondsman with blackmail in mind. The bondsman asked point-blank if he had killed Helen Kimble. “No,” the One-Armed Man replied, “but I was there and saw the man who did.”

Which prompted my older brother, who was watching the scene raptly next to me, to dramatically intone: “All of America was waiting to hear him say that.”...

“The Judgment,” however, ended up becoming a television milestone; for more than a decade, it held the record for most-watched episode in history. And even 50 years later, its legacy can still be seen in the much-hyped finales of beloved series whose fans demand proper closure—and in the outsized reactions to those finales, from the ecstatic (Cheers, Friends) to the savage (How I Met Your Mother) and fiercely debated (Seinfeld)...

An urban myth at the time speculated that there actually existed a secret episode in which Gerard was revealed to be the killer. In a pre-taped interview that aired on the late-night talk show The Joey Bishop Show following the series finale, Bishop asked [David Janssen, who played Richard Kimble] to reveal the killer’s identity. “[Kimble] killed her, Joey,” Janssen joked. “She talked too much.”

Really, though, Michael Zagor and his co-writer George Eckstein knew from the start that there would be no tricks in this finale—that Kimble would confront the One-Armed Man, and Gerard would ultimately be convinced of Kimble’s innocence. But first they had to put Kimble through the wringer, with Gerard taking Kimble into custody to conclude part one.

“I’m sorry,” Gerard told him. “You just ran out of time.”...

But all of their effort ultimately paid off in spades. “The Judgment” ends with the One-Armed Man dead, and Kimble exonerated, embarking on a new life with Jean.

A happy ending? Not quite. A police car pulls up beside him, and Kimble visibly flinches, indicating that he will probably be looking over his shoulder for years to come. It was an ending that fit perfectly with the show’s film noir sensibility; where an innocent man cannot count on or trust the police, and so-called upstanding citizens and institutions are shown to be rotten to the core.

"When your city is French in origin, and your Mayor and Governor are Democrats, and those most affected by this natural disaster are Black, don't expect much help from Bush." -- Left of Y'all (and the link works now too! )

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rtpoe

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #25 on: September 28, 2017, 01:36:26 AM »
ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO

Somerville MA resident Albert Query goes door-to-door to sell his version of a marshmallow creme spread. A few years later, he'd sell the recipe to two local candy entrepreneurs, H. Allen Durkee and Fred L. Mower. Soon it was appearing in stores, and there were ads on Boston radio stations.

No one's sure who came up with the sandwich idea.



rtpoe

Every year, in November, at the season that follows on the hour of the dead, the crowning and majestic hour of autumn, reverently I go to visit the chrysanthemums in the places where chance offers them to my sight.

Maurice Maeterlinck, "Chrysanthemums", The Double Garden, 1911.

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rtpoe

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Re: 2017: The Anniversaries
« Reply #26 on: October 20, 2017, 02:52:03 AM »
TEN YEARS AGO

A website is started for people to share stories of asshole customers.

Here's one of the ones that the editors at Not Always Right picked for one of their favorites:

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The Cake Is A Lie, Part 3

(My aunt and uncle own a small bakery, specializing in artisan breads, muffins, and bagels. They have never sold cakes, cupcakes, or doughnuts. They also bought this shop in 1989, and have owned it ever since. It is a busy week for them, as one of their bakers is out sick. I am filling in and helping them out while their baker is recovering. A customer walks in who I have never seen before. She is carrying an arm load of wedding planning brochures and folders, and is speaking to me between text messages she is sending on her phone.)

Me: “Hi, welcome to [Bakery]! How can I help you today?”

Customer: “Yes, I need to place an order for a wedding cake. My daughter is getting married next week!” *she beams with pride*

Me: “Well, congratulations to your daughter! That’s wonderful news, but I’m afraid we don’t sell cakes. We do offer various types of bread, muffins, and bagels, however.”

Customer: “Good. I want it to be a three-tiered cake. On the top tier, I want carrot cake. The second tier should be dark chocolate. The bottom tier should be lemon. All of that with cream cheese icing. Doesn’t that sounds wonderful?”

Me: “Yes, ma’am, it does. However, as I just said, we don’t sell cakes here. We only sell bread, muffins, and bagels.”

Customer: “Oh, and on the top tier, could you make sure the carrot cake has no raisins? My darling hates raisins!”

Me: “Again, ma’am, we don’t sell nor bake cakes here.”

Customer: “What kind of special designs can you put in the icing? Her colors are black and pink, and I would like the cake to have a very modern, contemporary look.”

Me: “Ma’am, we don’t sell cakes. I’m sure that a wedding cake specialist could make you what you want, but we can’t do that here. I do have the name of a great wedding cake designer that we refer customers to quite often, and you are free to make an appointment with her to discuss your daughter’s cake.”

(The customer is not paying attention; she doesn’t even look up from her latest text message.)

Customer: “Uh huh? Good.”

Me: “Ma’am, we don’t sell cake.”

Customer: *again, not looking up* “Okay, so the wedding is next week, Saturday. The wedding starts at 5:00, the reception at 7:00 at [Local Hotel ballroom]. I’ll need it delivered to the hotel no earlier than 6:00, and no later than 6:30.”

Me: “Ma’am, like I said, we don’t sell wedding cakes! I have the name of someone you can call, but with just over a week until the wedding I’m not sure she, or anyone, would have time to prepare what it is you are asking.”

Customer: “Oh, and just put it on my house account with you and send me a bill.”

Me: “Ma’am, we don’t do billing, and haven’t in the entire time I’ve been in this shop. Plus, we don’t sell wedding cakes!”

Customer: *suddenly looking up* “What do you mean, you don’t do billing?! I’ve been a loyal customer of this bakery for more than 20 years! I have never been told I couldn’t have a bill sent to my house! I am good friends with [Former Owner], I’ll have you know!”

Me: “Ma’am, I’m sure you and [Former Owner] are good friends. However, they sold this bakery to the current owners in 1989. She has not owned, nor been affiliated with, this bakery in 23 years.”

Customer: *goes back to her phone as a new text message comes in* “Yes, I thought you’d see things my way! Now, I have to run. Bill me; my name should be in your system!”

(As I try to protest and get her attention, she sweeps out the door while answering an incoming phone call. Since I did not know her name, or any way to reach her, I simply write off the experience as an oddity and continue about my day. I leave a note for my uncle, who is opening the next day, but he apparently doesn’t share the note about the customer with my aunt. The next week, on Friday afternoon, I get a frantic phone call from my aunt. She is upset and asking something about me taking an order for a wedding cake, and begging me to come down to the bakery to help her figure out what is going on. As I enter the bakery, the woman from earlier is back, having come in to check on the status of the cake order, and my heart sinks.)

Customer: *pointing to me* “Him! He is the one who took my order, guaranteed that it would be ready, and promised to bill me for it! Why would you hire such a worthless piece of trash?!”

Aunt: “Miss, that is my nephew. Please do not call him names.”

Customer: “Oh, I’ll call him whatever I want to call him! He screwed up and deserves to be held accountable here!”

Aunt: “Miss, as I already told you, we have never sold wedding cakes. I don’t know what you are talking about!” *then, to me* “Did you promise her a wedding cake, to be delivered tomorrow to [Local Hotel ballroom]?”

Me: “No, I didn’t. In fact, that is opposite of what I told her. I told her, several times, that we do not sell wedding cakes, and never have. I tried to give her [Wedding Cake Designer]’s name, but she didn’t listen to me.”

Customer: “Like h*** you did! You promised me a cake for my daughter’s wedding! Her wedding is tomorrow and I demand you make sure her cake is there!”

Me: “There is nothing we can do. I told you, several times, that all we sell are breads, muffins, and bagels. We don’t sell cakes. We don’t deliver. And we don’t bill people. I’m sorry if you didn’t understand that earlier. I’d be happy to offer you a couple loaves of bread if it would help smooth things over here. But, I’m sorry; there is nothing I can do about a wedding cake.”

Customer: “I don’t want your disgusting breads! I want the cake you promised me!”

(She starts swearing up a storm and threatening me bodily harm.)

Aunt: “That’s it! Ma’am, my nephew explained to you when you first came in that we don’t sell cake. He offered to put you in contact with a wedding cake designer. You didn’t listen to him, so this mistake is all yours. Now you are threatening him. Please leave, before I call the police.”

Customer: “You haven’t heard the last of this! You will all be sorry for what you have done here!”

(Sure enough, she stayed true to her promise. Over the next six months we heard from her, four different attorneys she hired, her daughter, and her new son-in-law. Each time we explained to a family member what had happened, they apologized profusely for her behavior once they realized what kind of bakery we were. Each attorney we sat down with who represented her apologized for wasting our time, and then dropped her case. Two of those attorneys are now regular customers of the bakery and love the breads!)

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They've expanded to cover stories from schools (Not Always Learning), stories from the customer and co-worker side (Not Always Working), and even stories about people doing nice things (Not Always Hopeless).

Given how the stories come from all over the world, it's pretty safe to believe that these aren't made up.

And sometimes, the assholes get just what they deserve:

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Hard Drugs And Harder Pharmacists

(A teen approaches my cash register very slowly.)

Me: “Can I help you?”

Customer: “Gimme all the f***ing medicine!”

(The teen pulls out an airsoft pistol with orange tip still glued to the front.)

Me: “The pharmacy is in the back of the store.”

Customer: “Oh…okay.”

(He holsters the air-soft gun in his belt and darts down the aisles to the back of the store. My manager comes out of the back room because of the commotion.)

Manager: “Who was that?”

Me: “Some kid looking for drugs. He went back to the pharmacy.”

Manager: “Why didn’t you call the police?”

(The teen runs screaming from the back of the store out of the front door followed closely by the pharmacy technician, a 35 year old boxer built like a fridge.)

Me: “Doug started working today.”
rtpoe

Every year, in November, at the season that follows on the hour of the dead, the crowning and majestic hour of autumn, reverently I go to visit the chrysanthemums in the places where chance offers them to my sight.

Maurice Maeterlinck, "Chrysanthemums", The Double Garden, 1911.